Sunday, June 14, 2020

Florida Mountains

Photographer Clyde Butcher  describes Florida clouds as this state's mountains.  It is a description that I understand as I spend summers admiring these piled up heaps of humidity and rain and thunder and drama...this is how you  see mountains over what are definitely flatlands. 
I have accumulated an embarrassing number of cloud pictures over the past ten days with all the humidity we have been enjoying lately. Thunderstorms, winds and heavy rain have produced extraordinary sunsets and sunrises and piles of black and white clouds overhead. 
I can't help myself. I take pictures of them against my own physical will and I find myself snapping away like a mad tourist in front of  a national monument.
I love seeing the light reflecting off the puffy white surfaces of these snowy clouds. In the evening and in the morning you get a golden tint. 
I hope you enjoy looking at these pictures as much as I do, if not there will be more pictures tomorrow of something else so waste no more time here today. I will keep photographing these things and they will show up from time to time because I really like trying to reproduce the awe they create in my head.
I am no mountaineer but I love reading about people clambering at high altitudes. So I look up and wonder what it must be like up there. I've looked down on enough clouds from aircraft to know they aren't real but from down here they look  like solid and snow covered slopes, the places mountaineers send back reports. Mark Horrell is engagingly self effacing on the subject.
For timid sea level creatures like myself the clouds of summer are a welcome change from the crisp blue skies of the dry winter months. We can dream of mountaineering derring-do as we look at the pinnacles and crests far above us.









I got soaked getting this photo of the orange flower. Rusty and I trudged back to the car a mile away with my camera and phone wrapped in a plastic bag which I carry for another purpose and arrived back at the car like two drowned rats. The blessings of Florida summers multiply as getting soaked can hardly lead to hypothermia down here.

I told you there were lots, too many to count. I am embarrassed.